Workload and hours

Newsletter

ATL Support Spring 2018

The Spring 2018 issue of the ATL Support newsletter.
Motion #17
Mon, 2018
  • Inner London

THAT Conference notes with concern the rise in the numbers of education professionals who have cut their employed hours from full time to part time in order to try to regain an effective life-work balance. Conference also notes that often these part-time workers still work fulltime hours.

Motion #16
Mon, 2018
  • Executive Committee

THAT Conference notes that the recent independent sector survey shows an ever-increasing workload for members across the whole of the independent sector.

Motion #15
Mon, 2018
  • Inner London

THAT Conference notes with concern the increasing workload placed on middle leaders and TLR-holders in schools.

Conference therefore instructs the Executive Committee to put forward to the Joint Executive Council that the Joint Executive Council:

Motion #14
Carried
Mon, 2018
  • Durham

THAT Conference recognises all the hard work our support staff members across all sectors are doing, but is alarmed by the discrepancies in expectations and workloads that they are facing.

Motion #13
Lost
Mon, 2018
  • Norfolk

THAT Conference recognises the impact that the dissemination of programmes of study, the creation of schemes of work, mid-term schemes of study and lesson plans place on the workload of our members, and in most cases this produces a tripling of work.

Derby Workload event

This your opportunity to take control of your own workload!

AMiE CPD - Workload: What's Possible?

No-one would disagree that workload has increased. Some serious thinking needs to be done to address this. There are three main areas, which have been identified by the profession, unions and the Department for Education which are causing additional workload. This course will explore those aspects of teacher practice which have greatest impact on workload and which can be addressed by reconsidering a demanding curriculum, what counts as information about pupils’ progress and how proper feedback trumps shallow marking.